Kombucha

As taken from a quick search on the internet for the official definition of Kombucha , Wikipidea states,  “Kombucha is a variety of fermented, lightly effervescent sweetened black or green tea drinks that are commonly intended as functional beverages for their supposed health benefits. Kombucha is produced by fermenting tea using a “symbiotic ‘colony’ of bacteria and yeast”.”

The starter

A few years ago, a friend gave me the inspiration after giving me my very first baby, or “colony” of bacteria.  “She lives” she told me.

I had introduced myself to Kombucha 10 years prior, from learning all the ways to improve the health of my and my families “gut”.  Learning that if the gut was healthy, then the body is healthy and thus has the strength to fight off disease and sickness.   After all, I’ve read that a healthy digestive system controls 95% of our immune system. I was committed to purchasing my several jars of Kombucha from  my Whole Foods natural market whenever I was shopping.  It definitely made me feel healthier and more secure about my general health when I drank it.  But, wow, it was pricey!

When my friend gave me the quick run-down on how easy it was to keep and raise your own colony, naturally I was jazzed to feed my little lady, and make/keep her as healthy as I could. I transported her home in a Tupperware container, then transferred her to a large, airtight glass jar with a screw-on lid.  I made her bathe, as instructed:

  • 5-10 C. Boiling water
  • 1-2 Black tea bags
  • 1/4 Cup Sugar
Kombucha live mother

Boil water, soak tea bags for 15 min., add sugar, stir until dissolved.  Let mixture cool together.  When cool to the touch, remove tea bags and  pour tea into the jar of the Kombucha bacteria.  Secure lid, and check on bi-weekly. Keep in dark, cool place (pantry, cellar, cabinet).  Add more tea when level drops below full.
So many great ways to store her.  I’ve since transfered her to a topferei, or a nice potted vase with a lid.  Don’t forget about her, as she can loose her liquid and dry up, or begin to mold.

When you have fermented her for several weeks, you can begin your daily, or monthly sips of this lovely, home-made version of Kombucha.

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