Neuchatel Taillaule Bread

Source:  Union des paysannes neuchateloises

Neuchatel Taillaule Bread

Taillaule bread

The history of this bread dates back a few hundred years.  This was a typical bread made in the French part of Switzerland.  The story is, it was baked on the hot stones in the wood ovens and sliced on the top to form the "zig-zag" deco when baked.   I'm so thankful to have picked up this tiny booklet put out by the farm women of Switzerland.  In this tiny 3"x5" booklet are some of the best recipes I've found since living abroad.  Many of these recipes are on this site, like the Vulley pie, or the Anise breads...A definite sense of heritage is felt when working through each of these special recipes.  Personally, I've found this bread to be close to brioche, or the Italian Panettone.  The Taillaule (which means cuts) is packed full of light airy dough, slightly sweetened and dolloped with raisins.  It's an excellent breakfast bread for special occasions, or to have on hand for a snack, to take along on a picnic, hike, or whatever the occasion calls for.

Enjoy!

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Course Breakfast
Cuisine Swiss
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 5 people

Ingredients

  • 1 kg white flour
  • 130 grams sugar
  • 15 grams salt
  • 150 grams soft butter
  • 42 grams yeast
  • 4 dl milk luke warm
  • 2 eggs
  • 200 grams sultana raisins
  • 1 lemon peel grated
  • 1 egg

Instructions

  1. Place the flour in a bowl and add the sugar, salt and butter. 

  2. Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm milk (max. temp. 37 C); add the eggs and mix into the bowl. 

  3. Add the sultana raisins and grated lemon peel. 

  4. Knead the dough until it is smooth.  Allow to rise to twice its size for about 1-2 hours. 

  5. Divide the dough into two equal parts.  Shape into two even sized rolls and place each one in a 30cm long cake form.

    Let rise for 20 minutes. 

  6. Brush the surface with the egg and them form a criss cross pattern with a pair of scissors. 

  7. Bake the Taillaules for 40 minutes @ 200 Celsius.

Recipe Notes

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