Penne Pasta with Wild Deer Sauce

Source:  myself:  cir. 2013

Penne with a creamy deer sauce

Intimidated by cooking with wild meats?  Don't be.  Think of them as a lean form of beef.  We order a deer from our local hunter whenever we can.  The deer usually comes in the fall as the hunters all begin to thin out the flock from the previous years.  Their philosophy is balance.  If you have too many deer in the area, they quickly become underweight from the mere fact of competing for forage.  Thus makes the winter a slow and painful one for the underweight, and soon to become unhealthy bucks.  Typically they hunt only the male "bucks" or Hirsch.  It's a slippery slope for me to support this, but if I keep in mind "balance" I understand the principles behind it.  Additionally, if you are opting for a wild dish, please try to have it actually "wild" and not farm raised.  Obviously if you can go into the local butcher, or market and pick up a pound of meat, it's been farm raised, thus erasing all the qualities of "wild".  As you'll see in this post, the meat is insanely lean.  Not a trace of fat or grainy cartilage to be found.  To me when I look at this meat, I see richness...both in flavor, and in stock.  The outcome of such a fine meat is pure perfection, almost to the point of it melting in your mouth if prepared properly.  Honor your meat when you cook with it, and it will serve you well when you savor it. 

Enjoy!


5 from 1 vote
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Course Main Course
Cuisine Swiss
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 5

Ingredients

  • 1-2 lbs venison this was a cut labeled 'Schnitzel'
  • 1 onion diced
  • 2-3 stocks celery diced
  • 1-2 sweet peppers diced
  • 2-3 TBS butter for sautee
  • 2-3 TBS olive oil for sautee
  • oyster mushrooms a good handful or box full
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2-3 cups bouillon beef or vegetable is good
  • 2 TBS flour for roux
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp tomato puree just for a hint of flavor and color
  • 1 lb penne pasta begin to boil when you simmer your meat sauce

Instructions

  1. Begin by dicing the onion and celery and pepper.  Sauté in a nice sauce pan, or Le Cruset style small stock pot

  2. Add your oyster mushrooms (I like oyster's because their flavor is very delicate and is not too strong like that of a shitake)

  3. Here's the meat...nice, lean, rich in color and well cured.  Cut in nice, reasonable cubes, but keep in mind, we're not making a stew, so smaller cubed pieces is best. 

  4. Add your meat once the vegetables have been sautéed and are translucent. 

  5. Add your cup of white wine

  6. Once the meat has been added and cooked over 50 percent, the final liquids are ready to be added. 

  7. Add the bouillon

  8. Keep heat on high until it begins to boil, put the lid 2/3 of the way on, and turn the heat down to a medium low.  Thus begins the simmering process, which means you will cook this liquid down until it becomes a nice thicker sauce. 

  9. Begin to prepare your roux mixture by combining your cream, tomato puree and flour.  Combine until it is creamy and clump free. 

  10. When your sauce is cooked down to half the amount of liquid (usually 30 minutes on simmer), you are ready to add your roux to thicken and add the creamy texture we're looking for. 

  11. Bring back to boil until it's thick and creamy.  Turn off the heat, and serve the cooked pasta on a plate, then scoop the nice creamy sauce over it. 

  12. Serve with a delicious salad, and nice glass of red wine


  13. Finish with fresh ground pepper and some fresh grated Parmesan cheese

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Comments:

1 comment

    • marisa gratny on 23/11/2017 at 04:01
    • Reply

    Made this for a dinner party and my guests were begging for the recipe. Rich and delicious and full of flavor! Very much impressed my friends- thanks again teawea!

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